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老徐在Wallpaper当客座编辑的四周(连载)

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发表于 2008-10-3 23:47 | 显示全部楼层 |阅读模式
Guest editor: Xu Jinglei



To coincide with the launch of our current guest editors issue (W*115) - featuring curated sections by creative stars Zaha Hadid, Rei Kawakubo and Louise Bourgeois - we're handing over the reins here at wallpaper.com (well, partially anyway) to a star of a slightly different ilk.

It's no surprise that amidst its unprecedented economic and social reawakening, China is fast becoming one of the planet's most dynamic creative powerhouses. What better way to experience that first-hand - and get suitably inspired - than to partner with one of that country's biggest names, the actress-writer-director Xu Jinglei.

With over a dozen films under her belt and a slew of accolades for everything from acting and directing (Spanish Film Festival award for 'Letter From an Unknown Woman') to fashion (MTV Style) and writing (Best Selling Author nod by the China Critic Press), she's already one of China's hottest young stars, ranked recently by Forbes as the 12th most powerful celebrity in the country.

Over the next four weeks she'll be selecting some of China's most fascinating creatives - from the lead singer of one of the country's biggest bands, to a young photographer capturing the zeitgeist of a new and empowered generation - profiling one a week with interviews, articles and galleries.

Needless to say we're expecting a feast. As publisher of the hugely successful culture e-mag Kaila, and author of one of the world's highest-read blogs, which to date has received over 100 million hits, her finger is squarely on Beijing's creative pulse - a worthy addition this month to the wallpaper.com family.

http://www.wallpaper.com/art/guest-editor-xu-jinglei/2644

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 楼主| 发表于 2008-10-3 23:49 | 显示全部楼层
Week one The focus is on Peng Lei, front man of one of China's most influential rock bands, New Pants.



Peng Lei Q&AVideo: She Is Automatic by New PantsVideo: Dragon Tiger Panacea by New Pants
Peng Lei, artist, director and front man of one of China's biggest pop bands New Pants, takes time out of his busy schedule to chat with our guest editor Xu Jinglei.


Click here to see Peng Lei's work

Xu Jinglei: How do you juggle being a musician, artist, filmmaker and toyshop owner?

Peng Lei: As front man of the band New Pants, people have got to know the real me not just the musician. I like painting and I have been studying and doing so since my childhood. To be a film director was a dream when I was in college. My working principle is that if one project that I’m working on shows no sign of progressing smoothly, then I immediately move onto other projects. Thus, I would never completely run out of things to do. The essences of all my roles are more or less interconnected, and each role is beneficial to the others.

XJ: Do the same things influence you for each role?

PL: You could say that. My interests are actually quite limited: for many years, I preferred the European and American 1970s and 1980s pop culture, such as New Wave and Disco, of which I was fond during my childhood. As a result, my present work resembles and reflects this kind of culture with only slight differences in format.

XJ: Where does your interest in toys come from?

PL: When I was a little boy, I didn’t have enough money to buy a lot of toys. So after I grew up, I bought all the toys that I couldn’t afford when I was little. Collecting toys is a habit that I have developed since childhood. I think everybody is like that, if they like something, they would keep buying. Moreover, toys are a very good form of entertainment: they are not complex like people, and one can always get pure joy from them.

XJ: Choose three words that sum up your creative output?

PL: Absolute realism, duplicity, Chinese post-wave.

XJ: Who do you want your work to appeal to?

PL: My work is enjoyed by both young and old.

XJ: What does your work take from China’s cultural heritage?

PL: I am quite interested in China's feudal superstition: when I was young I liked ‘Liao Zhai’ very much. Though most Chinese people today have almost forgotten these things, I really like referring to it in my work. For instance, my first movie ‘Peking Monster’ referenced Cixi from the Qing Dynasty with some modern and funny techniques.

XJ: How are young artists, designers, architects and creative students changing Chinese culture?

PL: I think that these people are studying and imitating the West. Because of them, China is becoming more and more like the West. I don’t think this is a good thing because no-one has developed a contemporary language for Chinese art. In the last two years, the situation for modern art has improved in the sense that a distinctive ‘Chinese feel’ is gradually creeping into all kinds of art work.

XJ: We’ve recently had unprecedented insight into Chinese culture thanks to the Olympics – do you feel this is the beginning of a more open cultural relationship between China and the rest of the world?

PL: Yes, certainly. Today’s Chinese people are not as backward as the foreigners may imagine and we do hope the whole world can look at today's China with brand new eyes. The Olympic Games was really a great party that left the whole world in shock. What’s more, in a sense, the cultural environment in China is even freer than that of the Western countries.

XJ: Have you ever felt a contradiction and perplexity between art and money?

PL: In the early years, I was quite puzzled as even though I thought my work was good, it didn’t obtain much recognition, let alone make money. But things became much better, and slowly my individuality and extraordinary style have become bankable. These days I am much more open-minded: on the one hand I make products to completely meet the commercial needs of the public with little individual style. On the other, I create according to my own desires, unconcerned by money or the market. These two kinds of creative work are gradually coming together, and I hope one day they could finally merge into one.

XJ: How do you regard the Chinese traditional culture, as well as the saying of ‘Of the nation, of the world’?

PL: Chinese traditional culture is very human. Though it looks somewhat negative at present, it is actually full of attitude. No country and no age in the world would have such product. I think that ‘of the nation, not of the world’ is a better saying. Each culture should maintain its own individuality and different cultures should be given time to develop mutual understanding. I think ‘global integration’ is the worst cultural ambition.

XJ: If possible, which aspect of China's cultural environment do you hope to be better at present?

PL: I hope that the focus of the media will improve. Overseas, in countries such as Britain, the media attaches huge importance to the promotion of their cultural industries, for instance the development of their rock and roll industry. China's culture is still in something of an ‘emerge of itself and perish of itself’ condition. The Chinese media still pays major attention to those issues that have been reported on for years: grain, resources, the population problem and the like - instead, it is Chinese culture that should be reported and disseminated vigorously and endlessly.

XJ: If you could take only three things to a desert island, what would they be?

PL: Cat, tape recorder and bed.

11 September 2008 | Art
 楼主| 发表于 2008-10-3 23:52 | 显示全部楼层
Week two Artist/photographer Lin Zhipeng comes under the spotlight.


Lin Zhipeng Q&ALin Zhipeng Gallery
Photographer, artist and magazine creator Lin Zhipeng chews the fat with our guest editor Xu Jinglei.

Xu Jinglei: What is the difference between a magazine creator, a designer and a photographer? What is your view of their relationship?

Lin Zhipeng: There is no real difference. To me, they all combine thought and manual work. All three require originality and creativity, although in different forms. The similarity between magazine production, design, photography, film production, etc. is that they are all visual. I choose these media because they are good tools for me to represent what I do. If the chance arises, I’d like to try shooting films.



Click here to view Lin Zhipeng's work

XJ: Are your influences similar for each role?

LZ: Not exactly. There are various things affecting my different roles: cartoon, magazine, film, music, travel, etc. I feel that production is really a process of reproducing life experience.

XJ: Intense amorous elements often occur in your photography, a frequent portrayal of chaotic love. Why does this theme seem to fascinate you?

LZ: As a matter of fact, ‘sex’ and ‘youth’ are the subjects I am more interested in with my photography. However, this is just a personal preference, a personal hobby. I feel that young bodies should be displayed, but that isn’t to say that older bodies are ugly. Instead, they arouse different aesthetic feelings.

I feel that I have an intuitive photographic style; it is part of my own emotional expression. Photography touches me most when I see a memory from a very old picture long after it was taken. I can see that the people, scenes and stories at that time, as well as in the time since, change. Some are sentimental and some are cheerful. The emotional journey varies. This is perhaps why I take photos continuously.

XJ: What is your view on Chinese homosexual culture?

LZ: China boasts a traditional culture dating back thousands of years. To China, especially in traditional sections of the community, homosexual culture is still a rebellious and unorthodox behaviour. However, what is interesting to observe is the rise and emergence of homosexuality in the country as Internet technology develops and interpersonal communication becomes increasingly convenient. I don’t mean that there are more and more homosexuals in China, but I think that more people have openly expressed themselves through using the Internet. Homosexuality is still an underground culture. However, art that incorporates homosexual themes can and does emerge before the common public – art is boundless after all.

XJ: If you could choose any setting for your production, what place and what theme would you choose?

LZ: I think Georgia is very beautiful, especially the streets and buildings in its small towns, and the personal feelings they evoke. Although I have not thought about theme, I think it is certainly related to the people there.

XJ: Which three words best sum up your creative output?

LZ: Casualness, improvisation and selflessness.

XJ: Who do you want your work to appeal to?

LZ: This is very vulgar – I want to acquire the recognition and favour of artists I admire. I feel that this is the most persuasive form of self-affirmation. I don’t care what other people think of me. I feel that a mixture of positive and negative responses is best.

XJ: What does your work take from China’s cultural heritage?

LZ: Not a lot, but some elements in my works are related to my childhood memories growing up in China.

XJ: We’ve recently had unprecedented international insight into Chinese culture thanks to the Olympics – do you feel this is the beginning of a more open cultural relationship between China and the rest of the world?

LZ: Certainly. Social statuses are always advancing and changing. Due to the impact of foreign events in 2008, especially the Beijing Olympic Games, as well as because of the improved Chinese cultural landscape, the country is more in focus and better understood now than ever before.

XJ:If you could take only three things to a desert island, what would they be?

LZ: A Camera, a lighter, and a mobile phone.

XJ: Do you ever feel that there exists a contradiction between art and money?

LZ: I do not feel it at the moment, because I am not a full-time artist. I am only engaged in artistic production in my spare time. For one thing, I don’t live on art; for another, my artistic production is relatively low cost.

XJ: What is your view on traditional Chinese culture, and the saying ‘Of the nation, of the world’?

LZ: To the world of contemporary artistic production, Chinese traditional culture, which dates back thousands of years, is, so to speak, an almost inexhaustible resource. Many contemporary artists engage with traditional Chinese culture.

XJ: Which aspect of China's cultural environment would you like to see improved?

LZ: More tolerance should be shown to marginal cultures; they should be given more publicity and more formal public platforms. We should not ignore their presence.


23 September 2008 | Art
发表于 2008-11-1 20:52 | 显示全部楼层
后续什么时候接上吖?
发表于 2008-11-2 11:22 | 显示全部楼层
看不懂···55555555
发表于 2008-11-6 12:58 | 显示全部楼层
我现在真的很后悔,当时英语为什么没有好好学习 ,能不能翻译一下
发表于 2008-11-6 13:13 | 显示全部楼层
我正在一个词一个词查。。。
发表于 2008-11-6 13:41 | 显示全部楼层
好长~慢慢看
发表于 2008-11-7 10:52 | 显示全部楼层
英语都快忘完了,唉...
发表于 2008-11-8 17:42 | 显示全部楼层
看不懂
发表于 2009-1-26 14:41 | 显示全部楼层
With over a dozen films under her belt and a slew of accolades for everything from acting and directing (Spanish Film Festival award for 'Letter From an Unknown Woman') to fashion (MTV Style) and writing (Best Selling Author nod by the China Critic Press), she's already one of China's hottest young stars, ranked recently by Forbes as the 12th most powerful celebrity in the country.

西班牙获奖、博客、福布斯排名12。
原来外国媒体也没有什么新鲜的说法。
发表于 2009-1-26 19:33 | 显示全部楼层
我得好好复习复习英语了~
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